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    New Jersey hill underappreciated as Washington's hiding place

    I grew up in the Watchung Mountains, in Summit to be exact.

    Despite the name, the town is not the highest elevation; that distinction belongs to Preakness Mountain in Wayne. The mountains run from Campgaw Mountain in Mahwah, to Pill Hill in Far Hills.

    If you take your arm and "make a muscle" it mimics the shape of the range, with the Ramapo Mountains at the fist and the Somerset Hills at the bicep. Summit is at the elbow, so neighborhoods on the northeast side of town look out to New York City and all in between, and on the southwest side, the view takes in Central New Jersey, down to New Brunswick.

    Tomorrow is July 4th. Independence Day.

    And this column is an ode to those mountains, underappreciated by historians -- overlooked for their critical role in the revolution. They were George Washington's favorite hiding place, and gave him quick access to iron forges that fueled his army. Their high points allowed him to monitor British troop movements from New York to New Brunswick, and respond by moving men toward conflict behind the safety of the mountains.

    MORE: Recent Mark Di Ionno columns 

    George Washington spent approximately 3 1/2 years of the eight-year war in and around these mountains, as he moved between the Hudson and Delaware rivers.

    The Watchungs were also a place of great anguish for the Colonial Army: the horrible winter of 1779-80 at Jockey Hollow, when food was so scarce Washington ordered the horses be taken off the camp, so the men wouldn't butcher them; the smallpox epidemic, which left graveyards of soldiers at churches in Mendham, Succasunna and Basking Ridge; a mutiny in Pompton, which led to the execution of soldiers.

    The mountains provided a sanctuary for Continental Army strategy. The nation's first West Point, an artillery officers' school, was tucked behind the mountains in Pluckemin, where The Hills development is today. At Morristown, Washington enlisted the French to send Rochambeau and 6,000 troops. From Somerville, he planned Sullivan's March, a war against Native 

    Americans in Pennsylvania and New York State. The iron in the western hills beyond the Watchungs was forged into weapons and ammunition, safe from British takeover.

    Of course, the New Jersey, as a whole, was also the site of inspirational victories. Trenton and Princeton, which turned the losing tide. Monmouth, the battle that involved the most number of men.

    But three lesser known battles were centered around the Watchungs. First was the Battle of Bound Brook, on April 13, 1777, when the British came up from New Brunswick, to attempt to control the upper Raritan River at the base of the mountains. The British were somewhat successful, but not enough to hold the position.

    The British again tried to penetrate the mountains during the Battle of Short Hills, in what is today Scotch Plains and Metuchen, on June 6, 1777, after Washington moved his troops from behind the second ridge of the mountains in Morristown, to behind the first ridge at Middlebrook. His headquarters was in the Nathaniel Drake House in Plainfield.

    The final British push into the Watchungs came during the Battle of Springfield, in early June of 1780. Under the command of Prussian General Baron Von Knyphausen, 6,000 British, Hessian and Loyalist soldiers maneuvered up what is today Morris Avenue and Vauxhaul Road in an attempt to climb the Hobart Gap and attack Washington in Morristown.

    The Gap was a convenient escape/ambush route through the first Watchung Ridge, which Route 24 now climbs at three-lane highway between Summit and Short Hills and descends into Chatham.

    They were beaten back, but not before the wife of Rev. James Caldwell, the mother of 10 children, was shot and killed at the parsonage at Connecticut Farms, now Union. The incident is depicted on the Union County seal.

    The Battle of Springfield was the last British attempt to conquer New Jersey. Had it been successful, they could have cut the colonies in half and controlled the major ports of the Hudson and Delaware, the two most important rivers in the colonies. After the defeat at Springfield, the British headed south. Washington and the French followed, and the war was coming to an end.

    Washington followed the battle from Briant's Tavern on what is today the Summit-Springfield border.

    When I was a young boy, we lived near Briant's Pond. There was a Newberry's 5 & 10 in Springfield where there was a mural of Caldwell standing on the steps of a church in front of line of American soldiers saying, "Give 'em Watts, boys!"

    My father explained that George Washington was here. This was augmented by unrelated trips to Washington Rock in the South Mountain Reservation and the one at Green Brook to look at the views. Both were lookouts for the general on the first ridge of the Watchung Mountains.

    In our town, there was a Beacon Hill Club and a Beacon Hill Road. They overlooked the Hobart Gap. I learned much later - not in school, but as a writer for this paper - that this high outcrop of Watchung rock was the site of one of 23 beacons along the high points of the Watchungs to be lit when "the British were coming."

    The point of all this is education and New Jersey pride.

    As I reporter, I learned much more about this history, enough to write a book called "A Guide to New Jersey's Revolutionary War Trail (Rutgers Press)," detailing over 350 war sites by exact address.

    As a proud New Jerseyan, I've tried to spread the word, through many columns like this. I urged the state to adopt this slogan, "Do Something Revolutionary, Visit New Jersey." That was in 1999.

    Educating ourselves about this history is as simple as following the geographic lexicon. Many of the Washington streets, sections and schools through the region reflect his presence. 

    Historic markers from in Bergen, Passaic, Essex, Union, Middlesex, and Somerset counties tell the story of individual places, but nowhere is the whole story of the mountains explained.

    So here it is. In our Watchung Mountains, George Washington won the war of attrition. The protection of the hills, and the great swamps that lie between them, kept the British at a long arm's length for 3 1/2 years of the eight-year war.

    Our mountains, which can be seen from all our northern cities and envelopes a great swath of suburbs where at least one-quarter of New Jersey's population lives, made the war expensive for the British. They were impenetrable.

    They are something for us to celebrate today.

    Mark Di Ionno may be reached at mdiionno@starledger.com. Follow The Star-Ledger on Twitter @StarLedger and find us on Facebook. 


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    Several counties in New Jersey are under a flash flood warning because of severe thunderstorms moving through the region Tuesday.

    Isolated thunderstorms fueled by the intense heat wave have developed in parts of New Jersey early Tuesday afternoon, prompting a series of storm warnings and flash flood warnings in several counties.

    The National Weather Service issued a severe thunderstorm warning for sections of Essex, Hudson and Union counties, where heavy downpours have been reported. In addition, the weather service issued a flash flood warning for the same region, effective through 5 p.m. Tuesday.

    nj-weather-flash-flood-warning.jpeg 

    The alerts were issued amid Day 5 of a severe heat wave that is expected to last through Friday, with temperatures soaring into the 90s, along with oppressive humidity. 

    As of 1:45 p.m., weather radar showed a large batch of thunderstorms lingering near Elizabeth, Rahway and Newark. The weather service said the storm is producing heavy downpours and frequent lightning, and about 1.5 inches of rain has already fallen in a short time span.

    Trees on cars

    There were no immediate reports of major flooding on areas highways, but the National Weather Service received reports of trees that fell onto cars in Belleville and Newark in Essex County and in Arlington in Bergen County.

    The initial report on the Belleville tree incident said occupants were trapped in the vehicle, according to Faye Morrone, a meteorologist at the weather service's regional office in Upton, N.Y., which oversees the northeastern region of New Jersey. 

    Thunderstorm warning in Bergen

    The weather service has issued a severe thunderstorm warning for parts of Bergen County, effective through 3 p.m.

    nj-thunderstorm-warning-bergen.jpg 

    Thunderstorm alert for Middlesex County

    As of 2:30 p.m., a strong thunderstorm was located near Carteret and Perth Amboy in Middlesex County and moving towards Woodbridge. 

    "Torrential rainfall is also occurring with this storm, and may cause localized flooding," the National Weather Service said in a special weather statement. "Do not drive your vehicle through flooded roadways."

    The weather service noted that "frequent cloud-to-ground lightning is occurring with this storm."

    Len Melisurgo may be reached at LMelisurgo@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @LensReality or like him on Facebook. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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    Parade goers were encouraged to dress in vintage clothing to celebrate 150 years since Montclair was founded. The 4th of July parade started on Bloomfield ave and was more than 1.5 miles long ending at Edgemont Park. The parade is followed by a picnic at Edgemont Park from noon to 4 pm. The day is capped off with fireworks...

    Parade goers were encouraged to dress in vintage clothing to celebrate 150 years since Montclair was founded.

    The 4th of July parade started on Bloomfield ave and was more than 1.5 miles long ending at Edgemont Park.

    The parade is followed by a picnic at Edgemont Park from noon to 4 pm.

    The day is capped off with fireworks at Yogi Berra Stadium on Montclair State University Campus. Stadium admission is $3 per person or $10 for a family (up to six people.)

    Ed Murray may be reached at emurray@njadvancemedia.com. Follow Ed on Twitter at @EdMurrayphoto. Find NJ.COM on Facebook.


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    But more than a decade after the last known mob hit tied to the waterfront, law enforcement officials say organized crime still stalks the ports in New York and New Jersey.


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    Vote to pick the best athletes in the history of West Orange.


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    There's possibly more to do in the Garden State in the summer than a person could fit in one season.

    New Jersey is a great place to be in the summertime.

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    Simply stated, there's possibly more to do in the Garden State in the summer than a person could fit in one season.  Here's a gallery of vintage photos that show people having fun in the summer in New Jersey.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    The girl was with her father about 11:30 p.m. in the 200 block of Avon Avenue when she was shot, police said.

    Police are asking the public to help find a suspect in the shooting of a 5-year-old girl Wednesday night in Newark.

    "Police are pursuing all leads and anyone with information is encouraged to contact us regarding this the cowardly act," Public Safety Director Anthony Ambrose said in a statement.

    The girl was walking with her father about 11:30 p.m. in the 200 block of Avon Avenue when she was shot, police said.

    She was taken to University Hospital in Newark with injuries that were not life-threatening, Ambrose said.

    ABC News reported the girl was shot in the leg by a stray bullet. Police would not confirm that account.

    Anyone with information is asked to call 1-877-NWK-TIPS (1-877-695-8477) or 1-877-NWK-GUNS (1-877-695-4867).

    Anonymous tips may also be made through the department's website at newarkpdonline.org or through the Newark Police Department app.

    Anthony G. Attrino may be reached at tattrino@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @TonyAttrino. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    The announcement comes days after the shelter on 224 Sussex Avenue closed as temperatures swelled to the 90s and the state remained on an excessive heat warning.

    The Newark homeless shelter that shut its doors on Monday has reopened thanks to funding from private donors that will allow the facility to operate through the end of the month, city officials said.

    The announcement comes days after the facility on 224 Sussex Avenue closed as temperatures swelled to the 90s and the state remained on an excessive heat warning.

    About 180 residents were inside and some told NJ Advance Media on Monday they had nowhere to go. A few of the residents sat on plastic crates in the park across the street as passers-by donated water and snacks. A group of activists posted messages on Facebook seeking supplies and help for the displaced residents. 

    Resident John Robinson said community members made some calls and were able to squeeze him into another shelter the last few nights. On Thursday, Robinson said he had just walked back from his job to find out that the shelter was letting residents back inside at 4 p.m. 

    "I didn't believe it at first ... I'm very happy," he said. "This is the only shelter in Newark that can house a lot of people like this, people that need it." 

    Robinson has a full-time job earning $14 an hour, but with mandatory child support, only makes $190 each paycheck and can't afford his own place. 

    The Sussex Avenue shelter opened in December as a temporary winter facility to house the homeless through March but the city was able to find additional funding to keep it open through June. It finally closed on Monday -- in the middle of a heat wave -- because it had no more funds to stay open. 

    In a press release Thursday, the city said "several corporate donors" will keep the shelter open this month, which costs about $200,000 a month to operate. The list of private donors was not disclosed. City officials are still working on a plan to house the homeless after July. 

    Newark will also issue a request for proposals for a facility with up to 250 beds and an organization to manage and operate the shelter in order to reopen the winter shelter in November. 

    Victor Cirilo, executive director of the Newark Housing Authority, said the Department of Community Affairs also agreed to offer 21 continuum care vouchers at state-administered facilities and 24 slots at non-profits funded by the state.

    The Central Ward shelter principally targeted the homeless population who had nowhere else to go and gathered at Newark Penn Station, the Public Library, Military Park and Francisco Park. It was open 24 hours a day. 

    The city said the health department will target key areas in the city where the homeless gather to inform them that the shelter is reopening. 

    Karen Yi may be reached at kyi@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter at @karen_yi or on Facebook


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    Police say they arrested the men, one after a police chase, who were attempting to steal thousands of dollars worth of beauty products

    A late night robbery Wednesday at a North Brunswick warehouse led to three arrests and the recovery of the merchandise, North Brunswick police said Thursday afternoon.

    Screen Shot 2018-07-05 at 2.57.25 PM.pngA warehouse on Jersey Avenue near the location of Wednesday night's robbery (Google Maps)

    Armed with a handgun, the three men assaulted an unarmed security guard and stole nearly $1 million worth of cosmetics from a commercial building on the 1600 block of Jersey Avenue, police Capt. Brian Hoiberg said.

    The security guard escaped and called police. Upon arriving at the scene, officers saw the suspects attempting to flee the building, township police said in a statement. One of them jumped into a box-style truck and headed northbound on Jersey Avenue.

    Officers pursued the vehicle until the suspect crashed it in New Brunswick, and police captured him when he tried to run away.

    While police pursued the truck, officers found two other suspects hiding near the building and took them into custody, police said.

    Police arrested Axell Mendoza, 30, of North Bergen; Alex Pelerigo, 50, of Elizabeth; and Jun Jang, 31, of Iselin, and found all the cosmetics.

    The three men were charged with robbery, burglary, theft, possession of a weapon, resisting arrest and eluding. They are all in police custody Thursday.

    The crime is still under investigation.

    Gianluca D'Elia may be reached at gdelia@njadvancemedia.comFollow him on Twitter @gianluca_delia. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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    From tax evasion charges to a fake bomb threat, celebrities from the Garden State and those passing through it have wound up in all types of trouble with the law


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    Batman tested very well with releasing toys and taking food calmly and is fine with other dogs.

    ex0708pet.jpgBatman 

    NEWARK -- Batman is a young male terrier/boxer mix at the Associated Humane Society in Newark.

    Shelter workers say "he is a calm, sweet boy, easy to handle and very comfortable with people."

    Batman tested very well with releasing toys and taking food calmly and is fine with other dogs. He has been neutered and is up-to-date on shots.

    To meet Batman and other adoptable pets, visit the Associated Humane Society at 124 Evergreen Ave. The shelter is open Monday through Friday from noon to 5:30 p.m. and weekends from noon to 5 p.m. For more information, call 973-824-7080 or go to petfinder.com/pet-search?shelter_id=NJ01.

    Shelters interested in placing a pet in the Paw Print adoption column or submitting news should call 973-836-4922 or email essex@starledger.com.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    BLOOMFIELD -- Tony Lanzera, one of the adults visible in the background, hung a garden hose in a tree at his home in Bloomfield so his grandchildren could run through the water and cool off, as seen in this photo taken in the 1960s. MORE: Glimpses of history from around New Jersey MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey If you...

    BLOOMFIELD -- Tony Lanzera, one of the adults visible in the background, hung a garden hose in a tree at his home in Bloomfield so his grandchildren could run through the water and cool off, as seen in this photo taken in the 1960s.

    MORE: Glimpses of history from around New Jersey

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    If you would like to share a photo that provides a glimpse of history in your community, please call 973-836-4922 or send an email to essex@starledger.com. And, check out more glimpses of history in our online galleries on nj.com.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    The first shooting occurred on July 4th just before 7:30 p.m.

    Three men were gunned down in three separate shootings in Newark in the past two days, authorities said Friday.

    No arrests have been made in the shootings, but officials with the Essex County Prosecutor's Office said they are unrelated.

    The first incident happened on Wednesday shortly before 7:30 p.m. at the intersection of 16th and Fairmount avenues. Officers who arrived at the scene located a victim, Dacraig Johnson, suffering from a gunshot wound.

    Johnson, 25, of Newark, was taken to University Hospital in the city where he was pronounced dead at 2:47 p.m. on Thursday. 

    Later that night, just after 10 p.m., a man was gunned down in a parking lot behind a building on the 100 block of Brunswick Street. He was pronounced dead at the scene at 10:10 p.m. Authorities did not provide his name.

    At the same time, just 3 miles north on Lincoln Avenue, police responding to reports of shots fired found two victims with gunshot wounds, authorities said.

    Both men were taken to University Hospital, where one was pronounced dead at 11:04 p.m. Authorities also did not identify this victim. 

    The other victim was treated for injuries that were not life-threatening.

    All three shootings are being investigated by the Essex County Prosecutor's Homicide Task Force, which includes detectives from the Newark Police Department.

    The investigations are active and ongoing, and authorities urged anyone with information to call the prosecutor's tips line at 877-847-7432.

    Overall crime in Newark is down eight percent, year-to-date. There have been 33 homicides in 2018, year-to-date, compared to 31 at this time in 2017, a 6 percent increase. 

    Alex Napoliello may be reached at anapoliello@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @alexnapoNJ. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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    Whitney was bullied in school, was sexually 'fluid' and wasn't too fond of Paula Abdul


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    The man, whose name was not released, was taken to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead.

    A man was shot and killed on the 200 block of Broadway in Newark early Saturday, police say. 

    The man, whose name was not released by authorities, died shortly after 2 a.m., according to Thomas Fennelly, a spokesman for the Essex County Prosecutor's Office.

    The Essex County Prosecutor's Office Homicide Task Force is investigating the incident. No further details were available as of 8:30 a.m.

    Olivia Rizzo may be reached at orizzo@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @LivRizz. Find NJ.com on Facebook

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips

     

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    The cyclist was pronounced dead at the scene by police.

    A bicyclist has died after being hit by a car on the 1600 block of Springfield Ave in Maplewood early Saturday morning, police say.

    The cyclist was pronounced dead shortly after the accident around 2:30 a.m., according to Thomas Fennelly a spokesperson for the Essex County Prosecutor's office. 

    The Essex County Prosecutor's Office Homicide Task Force is in the early stages of its investigation. Neither the names of the bicyclist or the driver of the car has been released. 

    Olivia Rizzo may be reached at orizzo@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @LivRizz. Find NJ.com on Facebook

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips

     

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    While detained, police are responsible for your well being, which can include a meal


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    Summer job leader has grown the program

    When Marsha Armstrong Acheampong was called to Newark Mayor Ras Baraka's office three years ago, she had no idea why.

    "I thought I had done something wrong," she said.

    But what could that have been? She was interning at the city's Office of Prison Re-entry, not exactly the kind of position that would earn the mayor's wrath.

    "I was nervous," said Acheampong, 35. "I had no idea what was going on. I was just an intern, and a college student."

    The mayor got right to the point.

    "He just looked at me and said, 'Here's what you're going to do.' "

    This was in the early fall of 2015. A few weeks earlier, Baraka had been in Detroit, where he saw how that city ran a large and successful summer employment program.

    "That was it," Acheampong said. "He wanted me to take our summer program and do the same thing."

    No small task, especially for a person still in college, though it was a master's program in public administration.

    "I never asked, 'Why me?' " she said. "He seemed so confident I could do it, so I just went ahead and did some research and got started."

    Baraka spokeswoman Marjorie Harris said Acheampong "impressed everyone with her intelligence, diligence and commitment and even pursued and received her MPA from Rutgers while working full-time."

    Acheampong came to Baraka's attention for all that, and the result is a Youth Employment Program that has grown from 1,000 students to 3,000 this summer.

    "The mayor has a talent for allowing you to step into a space you think is too big for you, but he knows you can handle it," Acheampong said.

    MORE: Recent Mark Di Ionno columns 

    Since taking over as program coordinator, Acheampong has forged partnerships with the new Newark ShopRite; the city's Dunkin' Donuts; Vonda's Kitchen, a Southern comfort food restaurant, and hundreds of other businesses that have put students to work.

    "We have kids everywhere," she said. "The firehouses, the prosecutor's office, day cares, churches, Beth Israel. ... We recruit sites, and people want to help because they know we are raising the next workforce."

    Part of that workforce was in her Broad Street office last week, just days before they started work Monday. Groups of kids in training squeezed past each other in the crowded hall. Questions flew. Answers flew back.  It was chaotic, but in an excited way. These kids were going to have jobs. 

    James Timmons, a manager at Vonda's Kitchen, told the story of a girl who worked last summer assisting waitresses and working the front desk. She's back this summer and "can do all those jobs by herself," he said.

    "ShopRite's goal is to always hire our young people in the summer program for year-round employment," Acheampong said.

    "Basically, it's a winning situation for the businesses," she said. "They get to train their employees on the city's dime."

    The biggest challenge of the program is to take kids with no job experience and instill in them a work ethic that will lead to success.

    Damon Redmond runs the Young Money Manager program, where 20 young adults, usually college students, do peer-to-peer financial coaching with the kids in the summer workforce.

    "We give them (the kids) very basic financial literacy," Redmond said. "But the biggest lesson is that they don't have to spend everything they make. We teach them to open bank accounts and put them on a savings plan. My people will check in on them, and make sure they meet their savings goal."

    Acheampong also has a force of 35 "life-skills mentors" who look in on the kids.

    "We make sure they're dressed appropriately, on time, and conduct themselves properly in a work environment," she said. "We want our young people to really understand that they, too, can be in the shoes of the people they are working for someday."

    For Acheampong, the program is about more than putting kids to work for six weeks in the summer. It's about building a strong community, a lesson she learned from her aunt, Davine Armstrong.

    "My aunt is an anesthesiologist, but she teaches at East Side High," she said. "She always put the community first and believed in empowering people. Not just her, but my whole family is like that."

    Acheampong's sense of empathy perhaps comes from being raised by two deaf parents.

    "People who live here (Newark) sometimes limit their neighbors," she said, meaning they don't believe the population as a whole can succeed.

    "But everyone is an opportunity," she said. "Everyone has a chance to succeed.

    "This program is not just about getting kids off the street," Acheampong said. "It's about giving them skills for the rest of their lives and training a workforce, so they can be great employees for the businesses in their own city." 

    Mark Di Ionno may be reached at mdiionno@starledger.com. Follow The Star-Ledger on Twitter @StarLedger and find us on Facebook. 


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    The Vauxhall resident was struck by a car around 2 a.m. on Saturday

    The bicyclist who died in a collision with a car Saturday has been identified as 29-year-old Jeffrey Scott, of Vauxhall, the Essex County Prosecutor's Office said.

    Scott was struck by a vehicle around 2 a.m. on Saturday while riding down Springfield Avenue in Maplewood.

    He was pronounced dead at the scene about 40 minutes later, Chief Assistant Prosecutor Thomas S. Fennelly said in a statement Saturday night.

    The driver of the car remained at the scene. No charges have been filed, and the investigation is ongoing, Fennelly said. The prosecutor's office has not released information about the driver.

    Marian Harris-Scott, who said she was the cyclist's grandmother in a public Facebook post, wrote, "We receive the comfort of God at this very tender time. Your prayers are received with thanksgiving."

    Scott's relatives were not immediately available to comment.

    Anyone with information is asked to call the Prosecutor's Office Major Crimes Unit at (877) 847-7432.

    Gianluca D'Elia may be reached at gdelia@njadvancemedia.comFollow him on Twitter @gianluca_delia. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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    Police arrested and charged a man with murder and kidnapping in connection with a fatal Newark shooting that happened in the parking lot behind an apartment building on Thursday.

    image001-Antwan Malone.jpgAntwan Malone, 31, of Hillside 

    Police arrested and charged a man with murder and kidnapping in connection with a fatal Newark shooting that happened in the parking lot behind an apartment building on Thursday. 

    Authorities charged Antwan Malone, 31, of Hillside, with the murder of 48-year-old John A. Sosa, of Roselle, who was found unresponsive in the back of an apartment building on Brunswick Street on July 5, according to the Essex County Prosecutor's office. 

    Sosa was one of three men killed in the span of two deadly days in Newark.

    The United States Marshal's Fugitive Task Force arrested Malone at a residence in Hillside Saturday afternoon, prosecutors said. 

    Malone is charged with murder, felony murder, kidnapping, conspiracy and weapons charges.

    Assistant Prosecutor Thomas S. Fennelly said Sunday he could not release any further details about the incident until Malone appears in court. 

    Malone was taken to the Essex County Correctional Facility in Newark pending an appearance in the Essex County Central Judicial Processing Court.

    The hearing is likely to take place Monday, Fennelly said. 

    The investigation of this homicide remains ongoing, officials said.

    Alexis Johnson may be reached at ajohnson@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @alexisjreports. Find nj.com on Facebook.

     

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