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    NJ Transit train service is suspended between Dover and Summit

    UPDATE: Service has resumed with 30 minute delays. 


    New Jersey Transit service on the Morris & Essex rail line is partially suspended after a tree fell on wires over the tracks Monday morning.

    Service is suspended in both directions between Dover and Summit after the tree tumbled onto an overhead wire in Morris Plains, NJ Transit said. 

    The agency says service will be limited between New York and Hoboken on that line. 

    In addition, NJ Transit canceled the 5:26 a.m. Northeast Corridor line train from Jersey Avenue in New Brunswick due to a "manpower shortage."

    Other lines are operating on schedule Monday. 

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

     

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    Dogs and cats throughout New Jersey await adoption.

    Canines and their owners are invited to Roosevelt Park in Edison on Oct. 7 from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. for the fourth annual DogFest New Jersey benefiting Canine Companions for Independence.

    dogfest.jpgDogFest New Jersey takes place on Oct. 7 at Roosevelt Park in Edison. 

    DogsFest will include speakers, dog demonstrations, music, food and more. The annual event raises funds for Canine Companions for Independence, a nonprofit provider of trained assistance dogs with six regional training centers across the country.

    Established in 1975, Canine Companions provides "highly trained assistance dogs to children and adults with disabilities and is recognized worldwide for the excellence of its dogs, and quality and longevity of the matches it makes between dogs and people." There is no charge for the dog, its training and on-going follow-up services. For more information, visit cci.org or call 1-800-572-2275.

    Individuals who raise at least $250 will receive a special DogFest gift. Information on DogFest New Jersey and fundraising for Canine Companions is available by going to support.cci.org/site/TR?fr_id=1610&pg=entry.

    Roosevelt Park is located on Roosevelt Drive.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at greghatalagalleries@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    A third team takes over the top spot in rankings, while No. 5 falls again


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    The fraud ran for six years and involved homes in Jersey City, Clifton, Union and other towns

    A New Jersey attorney admitted Friday he ran a $30 million short sale mortgage scam for almost six years targeting properties

    Christopher Goodson, 45, of Newark, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit bank fraud, the U.S. Attorney's Office said Friday. He faces up to 30 years in prison when he is sentenced Jan. 29. 

    "Mr. Goodson has accepted responsibility for his conduct in this case," his Morristown-based attorney, John C Whipple said in a email to NJ Advance Media. "He is embarrassed and ashamed that he permitted himself to become involved in the actions described in the (criminal complaint). He looks forward to rebuilding his life with his family after accepting the court's judgment at sentencing."

    Real estate agent Anthony Garvin, of Jersey City, is facing the same charge. The case against him remains pending.

    Conspirators in the scam setup simultaneous fraudulent transactions using the same target property, according to a federal criminal complaint. The scam allegedly involved properties in mortgage default in Jersey City, Clifton and other communities.

    Ex-detective gets 18 months in prison for mortgage fraud

    In the first transaction, the scammers convinced financial institutions holding the mortgage to accept the sale of that property at a loss, authorities alleged. The buyer was often another conspirator or entity that was part of the fraud, authorities.

    With the second deal, conspirators flipped the same targeted property from the first buyer to another buyer at a much higher amount, according to the complaint. That second buyer typically obtained a mortgage from another financial institution using bogus loan applications, bank account statements and other documents provided by others involved in the fraud.

    The scam ran from around January 2011 to August 2017.

    Prosecutors alleged Goodson and Garvin "rigged" the short sale process along each step to "maximize the difference in price between the two transactions and keep the victim financial institutions from detecting the fraud."

    Goodson hid the fact that he played different roles in the short sale deal, authorities said. He created fake pre-approval letters from a New Jersey corporation he owned that claimed to be a short-term lending firm based out of California.

    One of the homes illegally flipped is on the 2500 block of Adam Place in Union City. 

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

     

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    These are the 20 biggest questions surrounding boys soccer in New Jersey.


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    Which teams have taken a step forward and turned heads in 2018.


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    The former Archbishop of Newark is living in a friary in Kansas a few steps from an elementary school.

    Victims advocates are questioning why the Catholic Church has moved former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick to a home for priests in Kansas located within feet of an elementary school.

    McCarrick, the former head of the Archdiocese of Newark and the Diocese of Metuchen, resigned from his post as a cardinal last summer after he was accused of sexual misconduct, including sexually abusing at least two altar boys several decades ago. The 88-year-old priest is awaiting a church trial.

    The Archdiocese of Washington, D.C., where McCarrick had been living, confirmed Friday that McCarrick was moved to St. Fidelis Friary in Victoria, Kansas, after Pope Francis told him to withdraw from public ministry and events.

    Here's how much N.J. Catholic dioceses have paid victims

    "Out of consideration for the peace of the community at St. Fidelis Friary, respect for the privacy of this arrangement is requested," the Archdiocese said in a statement.

    St. Fidelis is located around the corner from Victoria Elementary School. The two properties share a border and the corner of the school is within a few feet of the back corner of the St. Fidelis Basilica attached to the friary, according to Google Maps.

    mccarrick schoolAn arial view of St. Fidelis Friary and Victoria Elementary School in Kansas. (Google Maps)
     

    Officials at the elementary school were stunned to learn a priest accused of sexually abusing young boys was living next door, the Kansas City Star reported.

    "I was never made aware of it until I found out through social media today," said Kent Michel, superintendent of the school district and principal of Victoria Elementary told the Kansas City Star.

    Some victims advocates questioned why McCarrick is not in a treatment facility or other location far from children.

    Bishop Gerald L. Vincke of the Diocese of Salina said in a statement he received a phone call from the Archbishop of Washington on Sept. 13 asking if he could send McCarrick to the friary in Kansas.

    Vincke said he replied "yes," his statement said.

    "I realize this decision will be offensive and hurtful to many people. Archbishop McCarrick is, in many ways, at the forefront of the recent firestorm in the Church. Many of us are confused and angry by what Archbishop McCarrick is alleged to have done several decades ago," Vincke said.

    The Kansas diocese is not paying McCarrick's living expenses, Vincke said. 

    "Please know that I agreed to this arrangement with the understanding that Archbishop McCarrick is excluded from any public appearances and ministry," he said.

    McCarrick has been accused of sexually abusing a teenage boy 50 years ago while he was a priest in New York. The former cardinal said he didn't remember the incident, but didn't think he'd done anything wrong.

    A second man whose family was close to McCarrick also accused the priest of sexually abusing him for years, starting when he was an 11-year-old boy in New Jersey.

    The Archdiocese of Newark has said McCarrick was previously accused of sexual misconduct with adults during his time in New Jersey that two resulted in settlements that reportedly cost the church about $180,000

    New Jersey's attorney general recently set up a hotline for victims to report allegations of priest sexual abuse. The information will be used for a grand jury probe into how the Catholic Church has handled abuse allegations, similar to the investigation in Pennsylvania that found more than 300 clergy members were accused of sexual misconduct.

    Kelly Heyboer may be reached at kheyboer@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @KellyHeyboer. Find her at KellyHeyboerReporter on Facebook.


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    See the 28 biggest games in N.J. boys soccer this week.


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    The best matchups of the fifth week of the season


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    A couple of upsets this week have changed the statewide landscape.


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    Through the first nine months of the year, 115 pedestrians have died in crashes, nearly matching the total fatalities for all of 2017


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    Three players from each of N.J.'s six conferences.


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    The best players and keepers in N.J. boys soccer this week.


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    The person, whose name and gender was not released, was hit near the Brick Church station in East Orange

    NJ Transit trains were delayed for over an hour after a person was struck and killed by a train Tuesday night in East Orange.

    The person was struck at 6 p.m. near the Brick Church station by a train on the Morris & Essex line headed from Hoboken to Lake Hopatcong, NJ Transit Spokesman Jim Smith said.

    The person's name or gender was not released and Smith said he could not say why the "trespasser" was on the tracks when they were hit.

    Service was suspended for about 10 minutes until at least one track was reopened to allow trains to pass.

    There were two hour delays reported on the Morris & Essex line as of 8 p.m. and NJ Transit bus and privately-operated buses were accepting NJ Transit rail tickets and passes.

    The incident was being investigated by the NJ Transit Police.

    Chris Sheldon may be reached at csheldon@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @chrisrsheldon Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

     

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    NJ.com picks the 32 games fans can't miss in Week 5


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    Granite finishes, steel appliances and views of the Manhattan skyline. Yes, this is in Newark.


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    Which sophomores are turning heads in 2018?


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    Joe Piscopo put some swing into "The Star-Spangled Banner," singing it like Francis Albert Sinatra, not as Francis Scott Key intended. Piscopo had it all down, the phrasing, the ad libs, the gestures to the drummer at cymbal crashes and brass blasts. He should. He's been paying tribute to Sinatra for almost 40 years, since his Saturday Night Live...

    Joe Piscopo put some swing into "The Star-Spangled Banner," singing it like Francis Albert Sinatra, not as Francis Scott Key intended.

    Piscopo had it all down, the phrasing, the ad libs, the gestures to the drummer at cymbal crashes and brass blasts. He should. He's been paying tribute to Sinatra for almost 40 years, since his Saturday Night Live days in the early '80s. Paying tribute, not imitating.

    Piscopo doing Sinatra was only part of the Jersey equation at a fundraising event last month. He was performing at a Colts Neck mansion, used in a few episodes of "The Real Housewives of New Jersey." Is that Jersey, or what?

    The 200-guests were all-Jersey, too. Manicured and glammed up in that distinctive Jersey way, for which there are no adequate words.

    Piscopo is an equally proud of both his heritages -- Jersey and Italy - and his self-effacing monologues between songs zeroed in on both, getting big laughs from the crowd.

    They were there to help fund "Joey Benefit," a film Piscopo has wanted to make for more than a decade. It's a Jersey story.

    "Joey Benefit is a guy from Bloomfield," Piscopo said. "You know, the kind of guy whose father once met Frankie Valli in a diner. We're shooting the whole thing in Jersey. We could do it cheaper in other places, but it has to have that Jersey feel."

    That Jersey feel. Again, it defies description. But you know it when you see it.

    JoeP2.jpgJoe Piscopo before his show in Colts Neck to thanks his benefactors who are helping finance a new movie "Joey Benefit." (Mark Di Ionno | NJ Advance Media)  

    The script for the film is by writer/producer Norman Steinberg (''My Favorite Year," "Blazing Saddles") and there was a lot of enthusiasm for the project before it stalled.

    "We all got busy," Piscopo said.

    His busyness includes "Piscopo in the Morning," a four-hour, drive-time radio show on WNYM (970 AM), a conservative station called "The Answer." Then he thought about running for governor in the last go-round. Then there's the matter of performance schedule. And his family.

    "I got a kid at every exit," he said to the crowd.

    Joey Benefit doesn't have those problems. The character Piscopo invented is a guy with talent, looking for the big break that never comes. Still, he dreams, and believes stardom is at his fingertips, waiting for him to grasp.

    "He's a guy with a tuxedo who never says no," Piscopo said. "He takes any gig he can."

    He's also a guy with a big heart. You have a charity? Get Joey Benefit.

    This part of the fictional character is pure Piscopo.

    In the coming weeks, he will be performing at the Towers to Tunnels 5K to benefit catastrophically injured veterans and first responders, and then at a fundraiser for Several Sources Shelters, an agency that provides for homeless women and children.

    "Joe is an extraordinarily generous and committed guy, to people who need it the most," said Vic Richel, who ran several New Jersey banks and chairs boards at Trinitas Regional Medical Center and Union County College. "Especially the kids."

    Twenty years ago, he started the Positive Impact Foundation for at-risk kids, then merged it with the Boys & Girls Club of New Jersey. He remains their spokesman.

    The list of charities he has performed for is too long for this space.

    Piscopo hopes "Joey Benefit" will him give a chance to show off another side of talent. He said, "There is a sadness to this character. He's older. He hears footsteps. I think of Mickey Rourke in 'The Wrestler,' or 'Broadway Danny Rose.' He's nickel-and-diming his way through life, which is beginning to pass him by."

    For people who think of Piscopo as only the rubber-faced funnyman from his Saturday Live Days, Piscopo as Joey Benefit will surprise them.

    "There's certainly depth there. That's the best way to explain it. Just a greater depth."

    Joe Piscopo put some swing into "The Star-Spangled Banner," singing it like Francis Albert Sinatra and not as Francis Scott Key intended.

    Piscopo had it all down, the phrasing, the ad libs, the gestures to the drummer at cymbal crashes and brass blasts. He should. He's been paying tribute to Sinatra for almost 40 years, since his Saturday Night Live days in the early '80s. Paying tribute, not imitating.

    Piscopo doing Sinatra was only part of the Jersey equation at a fundraising event last month. He was performing at a Colts Neck mansion, used in a few episodes of "The Real Housewives of New Jersey."

    The 200-guests were all-Jersey, too. Manicured and glammed up in that distinctive Jersey way, for which there are no adequate words.

    Piscopo is an equally proud of both his heritages -- Jersey and Italy - and his self-effacing monologues between songs zeroed in on both, getting big laughs from the crowd.

    They were there to help fund "Joey Benefit," a film Piscopo has wanted to make for more than a decade. It's a Jersey story.

    "Joey Benefit is a guy from Bloomfield," said Piscopo, who was born in Newark and now lives in Hunterdon County. "You know, the kind of guy whose father once met Frankie Valli in a diner. We're shooting the whole thing in Jersey. We could do it cheaper in other places, but it has to have that Jersey feel."

    That Jersey feel. Again, it defies description. But you know it when you see it.

    The script for the film is by writer/producer Norman Steinberg (''My Favorite Year," "Blazing Saddles") and there was a lot of enthusiasm for the project before it stalled.

    "We all got busy," Piscopo said.

    His busyness includes "Piscopo in the Morning," a four-hour, drive-time radio show on WNYM (970 AM), a conservative station called "The Answer." Then he thought about running for governor in the last go-round. Then there's the matter of performance schedule. And his family.

    "I got a kid at every exit," said the father of five to the crowd.

    Joey Benefit doesn't have those problems. The character Piscopo invented is a guy with talent, looking for the big break that never comes. Still, he dreams, and believes stardom is at his fingertips, waiting for him to grasp.

    "He's a guy with a tuxedo who never says no," Piscopo said. "He takes any gig he can."

    He's also a guy with a big heart. You have a charity? Get Joey Benefit.

    This part of the fictional character is pure Piscopo.

    In the coming weeks, he will be performing at the Towers to Tunnels 5K to benefit catastrophically injured veterans and first responders, and then at a fundraiser for Several Sources Shelters, an agency that provides for homeless women and children.

    "Joe is an extraordinarily generous and committed guy, to people who need it the most," said Vic Richel, who ran several New Jersey banks and chairs boards at Trinitas Regional Medical Center and Union County College. "Especially the kids."

    Twenty years ago, he started the Positive Impact Foundation for at-risk kids, then merged it with the Boys & Girls Club of New Jersey. He remains their spokesman.

    The list of charities he has performed for is too long for this space.

    Piscopo hopes "Joey Benefit" will him give a chance to show off another side of talent. 

    "There is a sadness to this character," Piscopo said. "He's older. He hears footsteps. I think of Mickey Rourke in 'The Wrestler,' or 'Broadway Danny Rose.' He's nickel-and-diming his way through life, which is beginning to pass him by."

    For people who think of Piscopo as only the rubber-faced funnyman from his Saturday Live Days, Piscopo as Joey Benefit will surprise them.

    "There's certainly depth there," he said. "That's the best way to explain it. Just a greater depth."


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    The former New York Giants star put the home on the market in April after being traded.


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    Upsets galore spark changes in Group, conference rankings.


older | 1 | .... | 532 | 533 | (Page 534) | 535 | 536 | .... | 549 | newer